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August 18 2014

andrelf
19:00
andrelf
18:52
2978 cade 500
Handmade hand guns by Tom Sachs
Reposted fromRockYourMind RockYourMind viacygenb0ck cygenb0ck
andrelf
18:49
5252 380e
Reposted fromwolejabole wolejabole viakeksmann keksmann

August 16 2014

andrelf
11:59
Play fullscreen
A Thousand Kilobots Self-Assemble Into Complex Shapes
When Harvard roboticists first introduced their Kilobots in 2011, they'd only made 25 of them. When we next saw the robots in 2013, they'd made 100. Now the researchers have built one thousand of them. That's a whole kilo of Kilobots, and probably the most robots that have ever been in the same place at the same time, ever.
-- spectrum.ieee.org
Reposted fromscience science viagem gem

August 14 2014

andrelf
20:38
3387 a526 500
Reposted fromSanthe Santhe viagem gem

August 13 2014

andrelf
18:46

Resin inlaid chestnut shelves

var imagebase='file://D:/Program Files (x86)/FeedReader/'; Resin inlaid chestnut shelves (19 Pics) 13:13 11.08.2014, Maxx, World Of Technology Big old cracked, knotholed, spalted piece of chestnut we got cheap from the timber yard. Time to tidy it up and make it good to go on the wall.
Sealing the holes with aluminium tape.
Set it somewhere good and level otherwise the resin will be a mess.
Ready to mix
Bag of pigment. Traditionally resin inlay is colour-matched to the wood, but I'm going down a different path.
Resin mixed up and standing a little to let the bubbles bubble out. Told you this wasn't a traditional inlay.
Poured into the big crack.
Doing a bit of a Clever with this edge.
Awwww yeah. This is going to look amazing. Now only the long, long job of planing, carding and sanding this lot flat.
Getting there.
The first coat of oil.They got about eight thin coats of boiled linseed oil.
Chopped up and ready for the wall.
Brackets installed.
Some spare bits of walnut for the other brackets.
And here they are. In daylight.
Later in the day, as it's getting darker, the glow resin really starts to come into its own.
It's on the bottom of the top shelf, so it's visible in normal use.
Wall robot approves.
Another angle. Now we just need some jars of pickles and stuff to fill these up with.
Reposted fromlockes lockes viamarbear marbear
andrelf
00:17
1565 d317 500
Self made bedside cot.
Reposted bybastinat0rmarbear

August 09 2014

andrelf
22:49
1159 60be
Reposted fromfoods foods viashallow shallow

August 06 2014

andrelf
20:27
9494 2758 500
OP's chair.
Reposted fromckisback ckisback viaHigh-Key High-Key

August 03 2014

andrelf
16:10
0129 2a0c 500
Reposted fromdeLioncourt deLioncourt viagruetze gruetze

August 01 2014

andrelf
20:06
andrelf
19:56

July 31 2014

andrelf
20:19
Reposted fromusefuldiy usefuldiy viagem gem
andrelf
20:19
Reposted fromusefuldiy usefuldiy viagem gem

July 25 2014

andrelf
21:49
3094 cb4d 500
Reposted fromJokr Jokr viaAndi Andi

July 24 2014

andrelf
13:51

MDR: Die netten Hacker von nebenan.

Schöne Berichte des Mitteldeutschen Rundfunk (MDR) zum Thema Hacken. Mit dabei: der Magdebuger Hackerspace Netz39 e.V.
Reposted bynetz39bastinat0r

July 22 2014

andrelf
18:54
7914 e67b
Reposted frombiru biru viagem gem
18:42

Building Patio Furniture for Fun and Profit

If you’ve ever looked to purchase patio furniture its either cheap and crappy …or expensive and still crappy.

So I decided to make my own. Because I wanted to drink beers on my porch and tell kids to get off my lawn.

With no further ado:

Before During After

Figure 1: My Porch Before, During, After

Step 1: Find Plans.

I’ve never used any Ana-White plans before, but I found these that seemed reasonable. After some review though, I found the cutlist sucks so any of the pieces with angled cuts are listed at final dimensions rather than initial rough cut dimensions. Namely the angled stretchers need to be cut long (34″ish) and then angled. Same goes for the back legs (~22″) and the 2×2 arm supports (~28″). So do your own due dilligence before slicing all your lumber up.

Step 2: Cut All the Lumber

Pine sucks and I hate paint. So I went with Cedar.

Rough Cedar

Figure 2: Rough Cedar from Menards

Cut Lumber

Figure 3: Cut to Size and Length

Rough Sand Cuts

Figure 4: Apply Belt Sander

I recommend using a belt/drum sander on any of the rough cuts to give it a cleaner finished look.

Step 3: Follow Directions (Assembly)

Aside from the cutlist, the plans are straightforward and easy to follow. I built the sides and back as assemblies because I couldn’t transport a completely assembled chair in my car.

Follow Directions part 1

Figure 5: Side Assembly

Following directions somewhat p1

Figure 6: Chair Back Assembly

I deviated from the design a bit as I didn’t feel like using a jig saw, so I just set the miter saw for 45deg and lopped off each corner of the back (which you’ll see in the final assembly pictures)

Starting Assembly

Figure 7: Starting Assembly

I transported the large pieces back to my apartment so I could put it together on-site. I don’t have any pictures of the middle steps, so it kind of jumps from here to completely assembled. Read the directions, you’ll know what to do.

Testing p1

Figure 8: Assembly Done (Structural Testing)

Ta da. A chair.

The beer made up for the sunburn.

Step 4: Finishing

Like I mentioned above, I don’t like paint. So I winged this phase of the project.

I like oil based finished to bring out natural color, so I grabbed a can of Danish Oil. Cedar is naturally rot and insect resistant, but since I had some spray Spar Urethane lying around I figured a coat of that couldn’t hurt either. Lastly, because I like the texture of wax finishes I applied Paste Wax to any of the upright surfaces where you’d touch the chair in normal operation.

Finishing

Figure 9: Done!

I applied the Danish Oil  by hand, which was a pain, but worked out well enough in the end it seems.

Step 5: Build a Second Chair

This second one is a little better finished based on some in-process learnings from the first chair. I picked up a countersink bit to help clean up the exposed screw holes and tried a little harder to be symmetric and even with the holes as well.

I need to either build a table, or figure out a way to add a cupholder feature. (But so far the porch itself works fine)

Step 6: Fin

Before During After

Each chair was something like $41 for material not including screws, glue, and finishes and took approximately 4 hours to cut, assemble, and finish.

 

 

 

Reposted fromhackerspaces hackerspaces

July 18 2014

andrelf
19:20
9419 d6ca
The future is now. Say hello to your new robotic overlords.
Reposted fromapp103 app103 viaAndi Andi

June 16 2014

andrelf
21:36
9003 b1fc 500
Reposted fromneon neon viagruetze gruetze
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